The pinhole cameras hand carved from a maple tree and held together with magnets

By Staff K 0

  • The Ondu cameras are carved out of chestnut and maple wood
  • Slovenian designer created them using funding from Kickstarter
  • More than 100 cameras are handcrafted in a workshop each week

By Victoria Woollaston

PUBLISHED: 11:41 EST, 4 July 2013 | UPDATED: 11:46 EST, 4 July 2013

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A Slovenian designer has created a range of hand crafted pinhole cameras carved out of chestnut and maple wood and held together using just magnets.

The Ondu cameras come in six different dimensions and film sizes ranging from the Leica 135 format to the 4"x5" film holder camera.

They were created by Elvis Halilovic and his brother Benjamin in a design studio just outside Velenje in Slovenia. 

A Slovenian designer has created a range of pinhole cameras carved out of chestnut and maple wood.

A Slovenian designer has created a range of pinhole cameras carved out of chestnut and maple wood. The Ondu cameras are held together by magnets and come in six different dimensions and film sizes ranging from Leica 135 format to the 4"x5" film holder camera, pictured

Prices for the Ondu cameras start at £46 for the 135 Pocket Pinhole, pictured.

Prices for the Ondu cameras start at £46 for the 135 Pocket Pinhole, pictured. It is the brainchild of photographer Elvis Halilovi¿ who makes the cameras in a design studio in Velenje, Slovenia. The project was funded through a Kickstarter campaign

HOW DOES A PINHOLE CAMERA WORK?

A pinhole camera is a camera without a lens.

It has a small hole in one side that acts as an aperture to let in light.

When you point the camera at an object, light from the object travels through the hole and projects an inverted image on the film along the opposite side of the box.

This technique is similar to how eyes see and process images.

The smaller the hole, the sharper the image, yet the dimmer it will appear.

A pinhole camera's shutter is manually operated by a flap of card, for example.

Halilovic makes all the wooden parts of the cameras himself but some parts, like the pins that rewind the film, and the pinhole require precise CNC machining.

There's only one screw in the design and the winding pins and backplate are held in place with neodymium magnets that have a pulling force of about 0.5 kg a piece.

Prices start at £46 and the project was funded through a Kickstarter campaign that raised more than 10 times its target.

He launched the Kickstarter campaign in May and raised more than £72,000 - from a target of just £6,500.

Halilovic said: 'In pinhole photography we use small tiny pinhole-sized aperture which we drill with a precision drill, that lets light through to the same material.

The wooden pinhole camera from Ondu on the work-bench at the company's design studio in Lopatnik village near Velenje in Slovenia.

The wooden pinhole camera from Ondu on the work-bench at the company's design studio in Lopatnik village near Velenje in Slovenia. Founder of Ondu, Elvis Halilovic used crowdsourcing website Kickstarter to achieve the funding needed to turn his hobby into a business

'And, because it has such a high aperture, this tiny hole, it produces unique images that no other kind of photographic camera can achieve.'

'When you take a picture with a pinhole camera not only the photographer is involved, but also the subject.

'Because exposing images with this kind of cameras takes a little bit longer than just taking a snapshot, so the people that get photographed with these cameras get away with an experience.'

Each of the Ondu cameras are carved by hand in a workshop by designer Halilovic and his brother Benjamin. Halilovic claims he can make about 100 cameras a week

Each of the Ondu cameras are carved by hand in a workshop by designer Halilovic and his brother Benjamin. Halilovic claims he can make about 100 cameras a week

Film is loaded inside each model and a single metal screw holds the shutter in place.

The smallest camera in the Ondu range is the 135 Pocket Pinhole camera that costs £46.

It has a pinhole size of 0.20 mm, a focal length of 25mm, and comes with a standard tripod mount.

The 135 Panoramic Pinhole costs £60 and shoots Leica format in 36mm x 24mm or panoramic double frames at 72mm x 24mm image.

It also has a 0.20mm pinhole size and 25mm focal length with an added field of view of 113° for panoramic shots.

Film is loaded inside each Ondu camera model and a single metal screw holds the shutter in place.

Film is loaded inside each Ondu camera model and a single metal screw holds the shutter in place. The back of each camera is attached using small magnets

Elvis Halilovic uses a wooden pinhole camera to take photo in Lopatnik village near Velenje, in Slovenia.

Elvis Halilovic uses a wooden pinhole camera to take photo in Lopatnik village near Velenje, in Slovenia. The cameras, made from walnut and maple, come in six formats and range in price from £60 for a 135 format to £132 for a slidebox that holds the paper in place

Ondu's 6x6 Pocket Pinhole costs £73 and uses 120 format film which makes the negatives 56mm x 56mm and has a 115° angle of view.

Ondu's 6x12 Multiformat camera can take 6x6, 6x9, and 6x12 images and costs £92.

Halilovic claims the cameras produce similar looking results as the 135 Panoramic but with 'much greater clarity', thanks to the 120roll film.

The camera has a pinhole size of 0.30 mm, a focal length of 40 mm and a standard tripod mount.

For £106 photographers can buy a standard 4" x 5" film holder that is secured onto the back of any of the other cameras with magnets.

Elvis Halilovic poses as a wooden pinhole camera is used to take his photo at the Ondu design and fabrication studio in Lopatnik village, Velenje.

Elvis Halilovic poses as a wooden pinhole camera is used to take his photo at the Ondu design and fabrication studio in Lopatnik village, Velenje. Each of the six Ondu models comes with a standard tripod mount, pictured

This picture is the image taken using the Ondu camera of designer Halilovic in his studio.

This picture is the image taken using the Ondu camera of designer Halilovic in his studio. A pinhole camera is a camera without a lens. It has a small hole in one side that acts as an aperture to let in light. When you point the camera at an object, light from the object travels through the hole and projects an inverted image on the film

This camera has a 0.30 mm pinhole, a focal length of 60 mm and a standard tripod mount.

The most expensive camera in the range costs £132 and is made with two sliding boxes that hold the paper in place for the exposure.

This means an image is produced before the camera film is developed into a darkroom, or before the paper in the changing bag is removed.

It uses a paper format of 10,5 x 14,8cm, has a  0.3 mm pinhole and a 50 mm focal length.

Halilovis said: 'Nowadays, most of us own a camera and taking a picture has become such an everyday occurrence that we don't take notice anymore.

'Well, pinhole photography changes that.

'Suddenly, you remember what you were doing on the day you took the picture in detail, who approached you to ask about your camera, how you took the shot, and how you felt when you developed the film - all the things missing in today's photography.'

Halilovic makes all the wooden parts of the cameras himself but some parts, like the pins that rewind the film, and the pinhole require precise CNC machining.

Halilovic makes all the wooden parts of the cameras himself but some parts, like the pins that rewind the film, and the pinhole require precise CNC machining. There's only one screw in the design and the winding pins and backplate are held in place with neodymium magnets that have a pulling force of about 0.5 kg a piece

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